About

Katrina Kurdy

I’m a senior yoga teacher (500 E-RYT) from the U.S. currently living and teaching in London with my husband and two children. I’ve been teaching since 2011 and completed an advanced training with Jason Crandell (2015-2016). I love to learn about the body and mind, and embody that knowledge through my own practice, to create an experience that helps you disconnect from distraction and open to the profound benefits of yoga. My classes are alignment-based and strong; yet they are also fluid, compassionate, and woven with steady breath. A personal witness to the changes yoga can bring to someone’s life, I find it hugely rewarding to share these practices with others.

As an adult there have been many things that have caught my interest, but I always find myself moving forward on a path of healing. I briefly studied premed, art therapy and pharmacological chemistry before graduating with a B.Sc. in human biology from the University of California-San Diego, and now I’m also a birth educator (KGHypnobirthing) and am soon to study mindfulness meditation and hypnotherapy. Despite my desire to do many, many things, yoga has been a consistent part of my life since I was in university. After graduating, I decided to deepen my understanding of it, which led me to teaching. As I started my yoga journey, I realized everything I was learning was so close to what I already believed. The philosophy of yoga is likely something you will already find inherent in you. Yoga is not a brand, a celebrity, a religion, nor postures that require a dancer’s flexibility. Yoga is a personal journey. It’s about looking inward-seeing more clearly, more honestly. You don’t need to be anything other than you, as you are right now, to begin. You just need to be willing to try and open to the experience. Yoga can make you feel good (physically, mentally and spiritually), but it can also challenge you. The practice is to ultimately find moments of inner stillness despite the challenges that might arise; for some, this takes a very physical practice, while others may be able to access that through breath and meditation.

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